Painting, Plating & Anodizing

 AnodizedPartsSmallAnodizing

Anodizing is an electrolytic passivation process used to increase the thickness of the natural oxide layer on the surface of metal parts. Anodizing increases corrosion resistance and wear resistance, and provides better adhesion for paint primers and glues than bare metal. Anodizing can also be used for a number of cosmetic effects, either with thick porous coatings that can absorb dyes or with thin transparent coatings that add interference effects to reflected light. Anodic films are most commonly applied to protect aluminum alloys, although processes also exist for titanium, zinc, magnesium, niobium, and tantalum.  Anodic films are generally much stronger and more adherent than most types of paint and metal plating, but also more brittle. This makes them less likely to crack and peel from aging and wear, but more susceptible to cracking from thermal stress.

Anodizing Benefits:

Durability: Most anodized parts have a long life span and are extremely durable

Color Stability: Anodized parts have good stability to UV rays and do not typically chip or peal. Colors are also easily repeatable.

Maintenance: The anodized coating is very hard and is not easily chipped or scratched. It is easily cleaned with common cleaners.


Powder coating

PowderCoatingSmallPowder coating type of coating that is applied as a free-flowing, dry powder. The main difference between a conventional liquid paint and a powder coating is that the powder coating does not require a solvent to keep the binder and filler parts in a liquid suspension form. The coating is typically applied electrostatically and is then cured under heat to allow it to flow and form a “skin”. The powder may be a thermoplastic or a thermoset polymer. It is usually used to create a hard finish that is tougher than conventional paint. Powder coating is mainly used for coating of metals, such as “whiteware”, aluminium extrusions, and automobile and bicycle parts.

There are several advantages of powder coating over conventional liquid coatings:

  1. Powder coatings emit zero or near zero volatile organic compounds (VOC).
  2. Powder coatings can produce much thicker coatings than conventional liquid coatings without running or sagging.
  3. Powder coating overspray can be recycled and thus it is possible to achieve nearly 100% use of the coating.
  4. Powder coating production lines produce less hazardous waste than conventional liquid coatings.
  5. Capital equipment and operating costs for a powder line are generally less than for conventional liquid lines.
  6. Powder coated items generally have fewer appearance differences between horizontally coated surfaces and vertically coated surfaces than liquid coated items.
  7. A wide range of specialty effects is easily accomplished which would be impossible to achieve with other coating processes.

While powder coatings have many advantages over other coating processes, there are some disadvantages to the technology. While it is relatively easy to apply thick coatings which have smooth, texture-free surfaces, it is not as easy to apply smooth thin films. As the film thickness is reduced, the film becomes more and more orange peeled in texture due to the particle size and glass transition temperature (TG) of the powder. Also powder coatings will break down when exposed to UV rays between 5 to 10 years. On smaller jobs, the cost of powder coating will be higher than spray painting.